Download E-books Stars, Myths and Rituals in Etruscan Rome (Space and Society) PDF

This publication deals a close and engaging photo of the marvelous astronomical wisdom on which the Roman calendar, usually attributed to the king Numa Pompilius (reign 715-673 B.C.), was once dependent. this information, of Mesopotamian origins, comparable usually to the planetary pursuits and to the prevalence of eclipses within the sun process. the writer explains the Numan 12 months and cycle and illustrates sincerely how astronomical phenomena exerted a strong impression over either private and non-private existence. a chain of concise chapters learn the dates of the Roman fairs, describe the comparable rites and myths and position the fairs relating to the planetary pursuits and astronomical occasions. specified reference is made to the hobbies of the moon and Venus, their relation to the language of fable, and the actual importance that Venus was once thought of to have for lady fertility. The booklet basically demonstrates the intensity of astronomical wisdom mirrored within the Roman non secular calendar and the certain festive days. it's going to charm either to realized connoisseurs and to amateurs with a selected curiosity within the topic.

Show description

Read Online or Download Stars, Myths and Rituals in Etruscan Rome (Space and Society) PDF

Similar Astronomy books

Impact!: The Threat of Comets and Asteroids

Such a lot scientists now agree that a few sixty-five million years in the past, a huge comet slammed into the Yucatan, detonating a blast twenty million instances extra strong than the most important hydrogen bomb, punching a gap ten miles deep within the earth. Trillions of a whole lot rock have been vaporized and embarked on the ambience.

Stars: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)

Each atom of bodies has been a part of a celebrity. during this energetic and compact advent, astrophysicist Andrew King unearths how the legislation of physics strength stars to conform, riding them via successive levels of adulthood ahead of their inevitable and infrequently unbelievable deaths, to finish as remnants corresponding to black holes.

Three Steps to the Universe: From the Sun to Black Holes to the Mystery of Dark Matter

If scientists can’t contact the solar, how do they comprehend what it’s made up of? And if we can’t see black holes, how will we be convinced they exist? Gravitational physicist David Garfinkle and his brother, science fiction author Richard Garfinkle, take on those questions and extra in 3 Steps to the Universe, a travel via the most complicated phenomena within the cosmos and an obtainable exploration of the way scientists collect wisdom concerning the universe via statement, oblique detection, and thought.

The Sun's Heartbeat: And Other Stories from the Life of the Star That Powers Our Planet

The thrashing center of the sunlight is the very pulse of existence in the world. And from the ancients who plotted its course at Stonehenge to the trendy scientists who unraveled the nuclear fusion response that turns mass into strength, humankind has sought to unravel its mysteries. during this full of life biography of the sunlight, Bob Berman levels from its stellar delivery to its outstanding destiny demise with a spotlight at the wondrous and mesmerizing, and at the heartbreaking sacrifice, laughable error, egotistical battles, and tremendous inspirations of the folk who've attempted to appreciate its energy.

Extra resources for Stars, Myths and Rituals in Etruscan Rome (Space and Society)

Show sample text content

The oldest recognized Roman coin, fourth century BCE . . Arcturus, the ‘‘guardian of the (Great) Bear’’, and Ursa Major—from Andrea Cellarius, Atlas Coelestis seu Harmonia Macrocosmica, 1660. . . The disciplina etrusca, the department of heavenly house, the vespertine emerging of Arcturus on 23 February and the morning upward thrust on thirteen September . . . . . . . . . . . The temple of Jupiter Capitoline: plan and hypothetical elevation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The constellation of the ‘‘great swallow’’ in Mesopotamian astronomy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... ..... one hundred twenty 121 ..... 124 ..... ..... 127 one hundred thirty ..... 137 ..... 137 ..... 138 ..... 139 Tables desk three. 1 desk four. 1 desk 6. 1 desk 10. 1 desk eleven. 1 desk thirteen. 1 desk 15. 1 desk 15. 2 desk 15. three desk 15. four desk 20. 1 desk 21. 1 desk 21. 2 desk 27. 1 Names of months in outdated Persian and Etruscan. . . . . . . . The Numan cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Numan cycle and the routine of the sunlight, the Moon and Venus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The pursuits of Venus and feminine fertility festivities . Roman feasts, lifestyles landmarks and the movement of heavenly our bodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Saros cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sun eclipses within the Saros cycle and the preliminary 19 years of the Numan cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lunar eclipses within the Saros cycle and the preliminary 19 years of the Numan cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Theoretical and historic eclipses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Saros cycle within the first 19 years of the Numan cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Composition of the revolutions of the strains of nodes and of apsides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Planetary interval family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Planetary interval family members with the times, months and years of the Numan cycle within which each one planet returns to its preliminary place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Correspondences among the Romulean and Numan years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... ... eleven 17 ... ... 24 fifty two ... ... fifty six sixty nine ... eighty ... ... eighty one 86 ... 89 ... ... 109 113 ... 113 ... 148 xxvii Notes Chaps. 1 and 21 were excerpted from the paper Astronomia e Calendario nell’antica Roma, given on the First convention of the Italian Archeo-astronomy Society, in Padua, on 29 September 2001 (see Rivista Italiana di Archeoastronomia, vol. I, 2003, pp. 107–19). bankruptcy three is from the paper L’etrusco, lingua dell’Oriente Indoeuropeo I, given on the Milan Glottological Fellowship on 14 June 1999 (see Atti del Sodalizio Glottologico Milanese, Vol. XXXIX–XL, 1998–9, pp. 229–49; reprinted in Magini 2007, pp. 21–7). Chapters four, 13–18 are extracted from Astronomy and Calendar in historic Rome—The Eclipse fairs, Rome 2001; Chaps. four, 6, thirteen, 14, 17, nine and 10 have formerly seemed within the paper Cicli astronomici e feste del calendario di Roma antica, given on the convention at the historical past of Astronomy on the Capodimonte-Naples Observatory on 27 September 1997. Chapters 7–11 are extracted from Le feste di Venere—Fertilità femminile e configurazioni astrali nel calendario di Roma antica, Rome 1996, and from I moti di Venere e le feste delle donne nel calendario di Roma antica, given on the Fourth convention of the Italian Archeoastronomy Society, in Lerici on 24–25 settembre 2004 (see ‘‘Rivista Italiana di Archeoastronomia’’, vol.

Rated 4.05 of 5 – based on 43 votes